Getting Started

Creating Flow Scripts is as Easy as 1, 2, 3

Getting Started

Flow Scripts is an industry leading call center scripting designer that empowers anyone to dynamically build and customize scripts on-the-fly to guide agents through simple or complex customer interactions. Outside data sources can be incorporated within scripts from CRMs, lead sources, payment processors and other data using standard APIs. We simplify the ability to build dynamic scripts by providing an easy to use call center script designer to incorporate powerful controls that automatically enable call flows to be constructed and deployed fast and easy. There is no need for technical resources to program and maintain complex scripts - we've already been there, done that, and are giving you the power to do so with this simple tool. 

Any campaign administrator or operations personnel can easily create a script in minutes using our drag-n-drop designer to build masterful scripts and call flows that allow agents to lead their interaction to the best possible outcome, and at the same time deliver exceptional customer service to your clients. Scripts can be tailored to any industry to enhance the operations of both in-house and outsourced call center ops. Whether your focus is on lead generation, sales, customer support, fund raising, customer retention, brand awareness or telemarketing, Flow Scripts will provide your team with the tools to transform your customer communications.

In this article, we’ll walk you through a simple example that will help you understand how to design call center scripts for your own campaigns.  

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1 – Creating a new Flow Script

To begin designing your script you must first create a Flow script. To do this simply click on the Add New Flow button.  

Within the Flow Settings window you will be presented with three fields such as Name, Description and Flow URL (see example below).  

Name: Enter a name to identify your script in the Page (This is a Required filed) Description: Enter a description (Optional) Flow URL: Automatically generated URL to access your Flow script directly Click the Save button to continue

2 – Learn about Script Controls

Action: Use this control to perform the following actions such as Dispositioning, Ending Calls, Creating New Leads and Navigation.  

Check Box: This control allows users to select one or multiple checkboxes for selection.  

Comments Box: The Comment Box is simply a large text field which allows for huge amount of verbiage to be displayed.  

Condition: This control allows you to define logic for navigation for example (IF checkbox = NO then Go To Page -or- Go To Field)  

Date Picker: Allows you to pick dates from a predefined list of dates  

Dropdown List: Allows users to select a list of possible options to choose from.  

Empty Space: This control is used to provide spacing between controls in your script.  

Expression: This is a conditional button which allows you to display output based on evaluating expressions  

Iframe: This control will allow you to load external webpages within your script.  

Image: The image control allows you to add images to your script such as your company logo.  

Multi Selection: This control allows for users to select multiple selections from a dropdown menu; option randomize feature included.  

Navigation Button: The Navigation control allows you to navigate to specific script pages.  

Radio Button: This controls provides a list of options which only one can be selected.  

Script Verbiage: Control used to create read only verbiage which is commonly used to guide users during interactions.  

Text Field: This control is used to capture small amounts of text such as Name, Address etc.  

Time Picker: Control used to select from a predefined list of time.

3 – Building a sample script

Below you will find several examples that will aid in helping you create your first script using several and simple dynamic drag and drop controls.

Building our first user interaction script by utilizing the following script controls below and creating a secondary page which will be shown based on user selection:  

  • Script Verbiage
  • Radio Button
  • Navigation Button
  • Condition
  • Empty Space
  • Within your script you will notice a Welcome Page has been created by the default. (Note: The Welcome Page is underlined in red letting you know what page you’re currently working on).
  • Let’s start by Dragging and Dropping a Script Verbiage control into the grey rectangular area under the Welcome Page title. (Note: When dragging a Control into the designer you’ll notice the control will highlight in blue notifying you of the proper placement).  
  • Drag and drop your Script Verbiage control into the designer as shown below:
  • The Script Verbiage Settings window will appear, enter the following information:  
  • Label: Enter a Label Name (Default can be kept but is Required)
  • Name: Enter a Name to identify your control in the Page Fields
  • Description: Entering a description for your Control (This is Optional)
  • Script Page: Page Location for which the control will be located (Leave as default)
  • Field Order: This displays the order of your Script Verbiage (Leave as default)
  • Click the Script Options menu to proceed. The Script Options page contains a well-known editor known as WYSIWYG or (What You See Is What You Get) which contains various formatting options such as Size Font, Colors, Hyperlinks, etc.  
  • To begin creating verbiage click anywhere within the body of the WYSIWYG and input your script. Then click the Save Settings button to save your script. See example below:
  • Drag and Drop another Script Verbiage control into the designer. This will be used to add a question.  
  • Enter the Label name and Name of the Verbiage script as shown in the previous step above. See example below: 
  • Select the Script Options and click anywhere within the WYSIWYG body to begin entering your verbiage. 
  • Once completed click on the Save Settings button to return to the designer. 
  • Next Drag and Drop a Radio Button control to the designer.  
  • Label: Enter a label Name (Default can be kept) Name: Enter a Name to identify your Radio Button control in Page Fields Description: Enter a description (Optional) Align Position: Choose an Alignment for the Radio button box (Optional) Script Page: Leave as default Field Order: Leave as default 
  • Select the RadioButton Options menu to create your list of options.  
  • Text: Enter the text you will like to be displayed as an option Value: Enter the value of the selection which will be entered into the systems DB (Database). (Note: This will not be visible to the user)
  • Drag and Drop the Navigation Button control; this will be used to submit the selected response in which the user will be navigated to another script based on the assigned condition.  
  • Label: Enter a label Name (Default can be kept) Name: Enter a Name for the button to display (The name will show up in Page Fields) Description: Enter a description (Optional) Align Position: Choose an Alignment for the text box (Optional) Script Page: Leave as default Field Order: Leave as default
  • Select the Navigation Options menu and enter your desired button width. Click Save Settings to continue.
  • The Navigation Menu will not be used for this example. The following below is for future Reference.  
  • Select the Navigation Options menu. This will display a drop down menu which displays a list of pages that you have created. By selecting a page from the “On Selection Go To” drop down menu you are instructing the button to “ON CLICK” to go to a predefined page. For this example we will only use the button face to add a Condition Control.
  • Click Save Settings to continue
  • Create a new page by clicking on Page Name field and entering the new page name follow by a description in the Description field as shown below:
  • Click the Add Page button to add your newly created page (see example below):
  • Drag and Drop another Script Verbiage into the designer.  
  • Label: Enter a Label Name (Default can be kept but is Required) Name: Enter a Name to identify your control in the Page Fields Description: Entering a description for your Control (This is Optional) Script Page: Page Location for which the control will be located (Leave as default) Field Order: This displays the order of your Script Verbiage (Leave as default) 
  • Select the Script Options and enter your verbiage (In this example we will enter verbiage that pertains to the Not Interested option selection). See example below. Click anywhere in the WYSIWIG to begin typing then click the Save Settings button to return to the designer.
  • Navigate back to the Welcome Page by clicking on the Welcome Page Tab.
  • Drag and Drop the Condition control into the designer  
  • Label: Enter a label Name (Default can be kept) Name: Enter a Name to identify your control in Page Fields Description: Enter a description (Optional) Script Page: Leave as default Field Order: Leave as default
  • Select the Condition Options menu.  
  • In the “If this field” drop down menu select the Radio Button name that was created in step 7 in this case Radiobutton01
  • In the next drop down menu select = Equals
  • Click the This Value drop down menu and select Not Interested from the options
  • Click the Go To Page drop down menu and select the Not Interested page that was created
  • Click the Save Settings button to return to the designer
  • Your Welcome Page should now look like the following example below.
  • Let’s test the script by selecting the Preview button within the Designer. This will give you a preview on how your script will function and look to your user during production.  
  • Click on the Preview button to view and test your script 
  • Select the Not Interested Radio Button
  • Click on the Submit button to see the result of the applied condition
  • Result from Clicking on the Not Interested button (Once you are done previewing your script click the Close button to return to the designer)
  • To keep your script from looking cluttered use the Empty Space control to space out your scripts from one another. See the example below  
  • Drag and Drop the Empty Space control into the designer  
  • Label: Enter a label Name (Default can be kept) Name: Enter a Name to identify your control in Page Fields Description: Enter a description (Optional) Script Page: Leave as default Field Order: Leave as default  
  • Select the Space Options menu  
  • Enter the desired Height spacing (Pixel Height is used for measurement) then click on the Save Settings button to continue

Good job! You've just created your first Flow Script! Feel free to play around with the different controls to familiarize yourself with all the options available.

About the Author

Marlon is an expert call center scripting programmer. He enjoys boating, fishing and playing his saxophone when he's not somewhere hidden, zoned-out coding.